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Topic: Rant about bike shop bashing and online information.

Posted on: 13th May 2009 1:24 PM    Quote and Reply


My experience with cust who do not bring their bikes to the shop is they always buy things that do not fit, for one reason or another. And they always come back and demand exchange, even when they scratch the item after failing to fit it. Asking you to bring your bike down so that this does not happen in my opinion is not wrong. If you stay far away and cannot bring yr bike down, I recomend you go to yr nearest LBS to yr place.

Why you call me a lousy salesman without knowing the full story. They try a few bikes before finally buying a smaller bike. The first bike, he is on tip-toe, I go and get another, have to align handlebar, some minor adjustments b4 pulling out the bike for them to try. That's why I did not stand there and take to them. You are very quick to shoot off your mouth, without knowing the full story.

You have to be responsible for what you say online, not sure don't say anything. If you not happy, go to other bike shop.

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Posted on: 13th May 2009 3:09 PM    Quote and Reply


Quote:
"Formerly posted by stonely0: Well it works both ways i suppose. The reason some bikeshop are nasty is mainly due to some customer who are there just to check out the prices, hang around for hours and pretending wanted to buy a bike but ended up after 2 hours of the sales guy serving them they say they wanted to re-consider it. That's pretty bad. Also there are bike shop who are so snobbish that they only want to serve customer who wants to buy. You see it work both ways... but i realize some shop don't publish price or won't be open up to pricing unless you are sincere buyer. Frankly speaking the price difference between shops are very minimal so it all boils down to service and after sales service. I don't mind paying abit more if the service is good and will not even to pay if the price is lesser but bad service. Also there are some shop that will make you feel guilty when not buying from them, they say "Oh you pay for this price? i'm selling it cheaper here" that hurts. For me i usually go into a shop with the intend to buy as i don't window shop in bike shop. i gather the info of my item online, make a few call to get average price. then i consider the reputation of the shop, the stock variety, the nature of bike they deal in before heading down. Ofcourse i will give them a call to make sure they have what i want. Once there i laid my intend clear that i will buy unless you guys screw up. That's simple. I hate shop who are so keen in closing the deal and forget the safety aspect of riding and bike fitting. That's a big no no. and i avoid 'Middleman' shop who everything also don't have had to order. That's bullshit. i rather go to the source if it's farther away."

I do agree with you on some part, stonely 0. But, on the part about window shopping, we all do window shop at times. Whether buying a car,motorbike or the humble handphone. Sometimes, we can spend alot of time talking to the sales person and not buying from him. That's what a good salesperson shld be. Customer ask, you recommend. Of cos, closing a deal is wonderful. But if not, atleast the customer is well informed about what you're selling and for me I really appreciate the effort put in by the sales person. That wins my trust and friendship. That's what keep people coming back, right? I always buy my vintage parts from an old bike shop. My first encounter with the Ah Pek oso not that fantastic but atleast he bothered to teach me a thing or 2 on vintage bikes, rather then walk away. We TCSS abit and now we have developed a bond. At times, I also find his stuff pretty expensive, but I still buy but becos other times, he just give me stuff for free. It's give and take. What I've learnt about being in the sales line for 20 years is that "YOU DON'T TURN YOUR BACKS ON YOUR CUSTOMER. IRREGARDLESS WHETHER THEY TESTED YOUR PRODUCT 10 TIMES,100 TIMES. OR WHETHER THEY KNOW THEIR STUFF OR NOT."  That's good salemanship. Period.


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Posted on: 13th May 2009 4:38 PM    Quote and Reply


Quote:
"Formerly posted by SIM37:
We've all seen and know why togoparts discourages the online bashing of bike shops and how many "newer" cyclists esepcially want to clamour for more "power" to the consumer.....
"
Hi SIM37,
I understand what you're getting at but your topic heading, "Rant about bike shop bashing and online information", why not remove 'shop bashing' from the heading since it's not encouraged? I started posting my personal experience here because I tot this is the topic, where all cyclist share personal unpleasant experience with fellow cyclist. But after further reading of previous post, I guess I was wrong. For posting and airing my personal unpleasant experience, I'm now being threatened with legal actions...what have I done wrong? Is sharing bad experiences with fellow cyclist wrong? Did I ask/write anything about boycotting the particular shop? No. Did I use any vulgarities in my postings? No. Did I mention the person's name? No. Did I deflame any person? No. I'm just sharing my personal experience, that's all. Haiz...guess some people just can't accept feedbacks. Cheers.. :P


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Posted on: 15th May 2009 4:54 PM    Quote and Reply


Oh my god..

 

I wrote that post back in 2005 to highlight specifically about instances like what you've experienced there.

 

By the way, I know Peter personally and I do not get this type of treatment from him nor do I go out and openly bash him without any form of substantial evidence.

I can also see that both of you have had your say and that you've decided to get it over with.

There's a difference between "bashing" and "feedback"

I don't think I need to highlight the differences between the two words. Its a thin line though sometimes.

That being said, I have never been treated like a 2nd class citizen by Peter. And for the record, I really don't know what "mini bike" means also. 


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Posted on: 11th Jun 2009 10:59 AM    Quote and Reply


I think some people need to learn some paragraphing.

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Posted on: 12th Jun 2009 9:50 AM    Quote and Reply


Quote:
"Formerly posted by xALmoN: I think some people need to learn some paragraphing.
"

 

Actually not "some" its A LOT, especially forum participants who tend to post often in the months of June and December.


Not only paragraphing, but 5pewlling, L33t sp33c4 correction as well.

Its damned painful to read.


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Posted on: 3rd Jul 2009 9:58 AM    Quote and Reply


i agree generally with the thread, that users should not try to manipulate bike shop owners. no doubt there.

but im afraid that  the original post almost directs us to accept non competitive (price and service) and anti-customer centric behavior.

i am sorry, this is the anti-thesis of a competitive market. Like all customers are not sages, all bike shop owners aren't saints either. people should post the facts of unpleasant experiences and it is for the reader to judge (hopefully after hearing both sides).

also the remark about phones, sms-es etc. only accentuates what I am trying to say about competitive markets. In that era (I was not there to see it) there was imperfect information in the market, and dishonest sellers could get away with stuff.
Welcome to the new world friends, here the fittest will survive.

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Posted on: 3rd Jul 2009 3:37 PM    Quote and Reply


Quote:
"Formerly posted by akhildoegar:

i agree generally with the thread, that users should not try to manipulate bike shop owners. no doubt there.

but im afraid that  the original post almost directs us to accept non competitive (price and service) and anti-customer centric behavior.

i am sorry, this is the anti-thesis of a competitive market. Like all customers are not sages, all bike shop owners aren't saints either. people should post the facts of unpleasant experiences and it is for the reader to judge (hopefully after hearing both sides).

also the remark about phones, sms-es etc. only accentuates what I am trying to say about competitive markets. In that era (I was not there to see it) there was imperfect information in the market, and dishonest sellers could get away with stuff.
Welcome to the new world friends, here the fittest will survive.

"



Yup I do agree with you the "fittest" will survive,

 

At the end of the day, under an efficient market hypothesis, you can see that "some" bike shops always have a bad rep no matter online or offline, and the traditionalist who have always prided themselves on good service and excellent after sales support.

The "fittest" have been around before the internet and even today.


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Posted on: 12th Apr 2010 3:53 PM    Quote and Reply


I agree that in the end, shop that deliver good, honest service should triumph over the sleazy, but informative forums such as this help consumers to make educated decisions on where to spend their money. Most legitimate forums (outside of China, perhaps) allow negative postings provided they are not slanderous or libelous. For a forum to to ban members from letting off steam or sharing valuable experiences on this site will give the impression TogoParts is protecting existing or potential advertisers.

Here's my story. There's nothing here that could be legally contentious and it is a fair and honest report of a very bad experience I had with the Singapore and Thailand distributor of a big American bike brand that starts with "C" and and ends with "dale". (No one will ever guess, eh?)

I?m not a lone voice speaking out again this shop, and on the MTB forum in Thailand (use goggle translate) there?s a long thread where victims of C Dale?s shady practices have come forward and on (a Singapore bike site) one riding club has launched a boycott of the shop in Singapore and Bangkok. To join in simply email cannasia@singnet.com.sg"> cannasia@singnet.com.sg with the message ?I?ve joined the Flat Out Boycott of Your Shop?.

About six months ago I took my top-of-the-line Yeti ASR to the branch in Bangkok for a servicing. At night, the shop stored my bike outside in an poorly secured area and it was subsequently stolen.

The grinning owner we'll call Fish, accepted ?some responsibility? (I guess the rest of the responsibility lay with me for trusting him with my bike?) and admitted that they didn?t have insurance for ?clients? bikes. He promised to ?do me right? and showed me the cheapest bike on the floor and said ?how about this??

I explained that my Yeti was a US$3,000 bike with tons of upgrades, and was in good condition and I expect something better. From then on, he went into stall mode, but I remained persistent.

Well, six months, 51 emails, 10 phone calls and seven trips to the shop later, I?m finally presented with an old Trek. By this time I?m so worn down by the endless run-around that I take the bike home.

The next day the brakes don?t work and I take a closer look at the bike and find a number of ?reconditioned? parts have been added, such as the brakes, a set of out of production damaged RockSkox shocks and an old saddle. On closer look it was clear this frame has been sitting around rusting somewhere for a very, very long time before it was given to me.

I called the shop to say the bike wasn?t a fair replacement for my Yeti and got an earful of swearing from Chris?s wife - ?Your Yeti was !$*Z@&! If you don?t like it - sue me!?

Yesterday I took the Trek to another shop for new LX discs and am saving to get the new shocks.

The message is that there are lots of choices for bikes out there and you?d be wise the give these characters a wide miss. Their business practices are very questionable and their main objective is to separate you from your hard earned cash anyway they can.

If after reading this and you still can?t live without a C, approach your purchase with eyes wide open and be careful. Here?s a list of just a few scams being played on unsuspecting customers.

1. Get everything in writing. Have the shop put in writing that everything on the bike is new and a current model. There have been instances where damaged and reconditioned parts have been added to new frames.
2. Ask to see the actual bike that you?ll get. The old bait-and-switch scam is alive and well. This is where you?re shown a perfect bike on the showroom floor, but when you unpack your bike at home, it is damaged or has old or used components on it.
3. Don?t rush. Look over the bike very carefully. We?re all a little excited/nervous when making a big-ticket purchase and tend to rush things. Unscrupulous merchants know this and try and rush us into closing the sale. Check all components very carefully. Are they new? Is the finish dull (a clue to a reconditioned part), are they working?
4. Take a good look at the fame. Check for the usual dents, bangs, bends and scratches. Also look for slight changes in colouring. These are telltale signs that the frame has been cracked in transit and patched-up using an industrial-grade putty and repainted. The crack usually doesn?t appear for a few months, and by then it is difficult to prove it was there on purchase.

This message is being posted on webs sites and bike forums worldwide. The Singapore and Thai agent discussed here will try to discredit it and remove it where they can, but they can?t stop this message from getting out.

After all, you now know my story.

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Posted on: 13th Apr 2010 2:50 AM    Quote and Reply


Quote:
"Formerly posted by YetiYoung: I agree that in the end, shop that deliver good, honest service should triumph over the sleazy, but informative forums such as this help consumers to make educated decisions on where to spend their money. Most legitimate forums (outside of China, perhaps) allow negative postings provided they are not slanderous or libelous. For a forum to to ban members from letting off steam or sharing valuable experiences on this site will give the impression TogoParts is protecting existing or potential advertisers. Here's my story. There's nothing here that could be legally contentious and it is a fair and honest report of a very bad experience I had with the Singapore and Thailand distributor of a big American bike brand that starts with "C" and and ends with "dale". (No one will ever guess, eh?) I’m not a lone voice speaking out again this shop, and on the MTB forum in Thailand (use goggle translate) there’s a long thread where victims of C Dale’s shady practices have come forward and on (a Singapore bike site) one riding club has launched a boycott of the shop in Singapore and Bangkok. To join in simply email cannasia@singnet.com.sg"> cannasia@singnet.com.sg with the message “I’ve joined the Flat Out Boycott of Your Shop”. About six months ago I took my top-of-the-line Yeti ASR to the branch in Bangkok for a servicing. At night, the shop stored my bike outside in an poorly secured area and it was subsequently stolen. The grinning owner we'll call Fish, accepted “some responsibility” (I guess the rest of the responsibility lay with me for trusting him with my bike?) and admitted that they didn’t have insurance for “clients” bikes. He promised to “do me right” and showed me the cheapest bike on the floor and said “how about this”? I explained that my Yeti was a US$3,000 bike with tons of upgrades, and was in good condition and I expect something better. From then on, he went into stall mode, but I remained persistent. Well, six months, 51 emails, 10 phone calls and seven trips to the shop later, I’m finally presented with an old Trek. By this time I’m so worn down by the endless run-around that I take the bike home. The next day the brakes don’t work and I take a closer look at the bike and find a number of “reconditioned” parts have been added, such as the brakes, a set of out of production damaged RockSkox shocks and an old saddle. On closer look it was clear this frame has been sitting around rusting somewhere for a very, very long time before it was given to me. I called the shop to say the bike wasn’t a fair replacement for my Yeti and got an earful of swearing from Chris’s wife - “Your Yeti was !$*Z@&! If you don’t like it - sue me!” Yesterday I took the Trek to another shop for new LX discs and am saving to get the new shocks. The message is that there are lots of choices for bikes out there and you’d be wise the give these characters a wide miss. Their business practices are very questionable and their main objective is to separate you from your hard earned cash anyway they can. If after reading this and you still can’t live without a C, approach your purchase with eyes wide open and be careful. Here’s a list of just a few scams being played on unsuspecting customers. 1. Get everything in writing. Have the shop put in writing that everything on the bike is new and a current model. There have been instances where damaged and reconditioned parts have been added to new frames. 2. Ask to see the actual bike that you’ll get. The old bait-and-switch scam is alive and well. This is where you’re shown a perfect bike on the showroom floor, but when you unpack your bike at home, it is damaged or has old or used components on it. 3. Don’t rush. Look over the bike very carefully. We’re all a little excited/nervous when making a big-ticket purchase and tend to rush things. Unscrupulous merchants know this and try and rush us into closing the sale. Check all components very carefully. Are they new? Is the finish dull (a clue to a reconditioned part), are they working? 4. Take a good look at the fame. Check for the usual dents, bangs, bends and scratches. Also look for slight changes in colouring. These are telltale signs that the frame has been cracked in transit and patched-up using an industrial-grade putty and repainted. The crack usually doesn’t appear for a few months, and by then it is difficult to prove it was there on purchase. This message is being posted on webs sites and bike forums worldwide. The Singapore and Thai agent discussed here will try to discredit it and remove it where they can, but they can’t stop this message from getting out. After all, you now know my story."





Sorry to hear about your demise. I've been to a fair share of stores in Singapore and to be honest, few have given me the peace of mind. 

Some have prices that are priced way too high. Some have bad mechanics but great service. Some have bad prices, bad service and bad mechanics. 

So far, I'll give Attitude bikes a great thumbs up. From my early childish rowdy days in TGP, they've pretty much tolerated all kinds of nuisance from me but at the end of the day, its them who got my Faulty Maguras settled when the C shop sold me a factory recalled one. 

Shan't delve too much into that since it happened years ago but yeah, recently, I just bought my first bike online completely. It was a great experience and I felt that I learnt a lot and became much more savvy.

Also discovered The Bike Boutique and really liked their great service and friendly staff. 

Anyway, I'm not at all surprised with YetiYoung's account of the C store and their business antics. I too wasn't a very satisfied customer.

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