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Thread is Sticky Topic: BT 101 - Advice for BT newbie?

Posted on: 17th Mar 2009 11:02 PM    Quote and Reply


There's stink from the mud at Tampines?

YIKES.


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Posted on: 18th Mar 2009 4:23 AM    Quote and Reply


There are too many things to note and I'm hardly the best person to give advice on this, but I've had the pleasure of learning from some very good riders and their tips have helped me a fair bit and I'm hoping that some of this advice might be useful to you.

Firstly, if you're getting into MTBing from a roadie background, you'll actually find that there's a lot you can bring from your roadie background to MTBing and vice versa - particularly issues such a pacing, cadence, etc. That said, the most major difference is obviously the nature of the terrain itself. On the road, you're thinking more about yourself and the objects around you... on the trail you're thinking more about the objects under you. In essence, much like road riding, it's about "feel", but the "feel" you get in off-road riding, is very different and you'll need to realise what it is and how it relates to the discipline.

As a rider transitioning from road riding to trail riding, you might find it helpful to adjust your mindset when you're riding the trail because often, the part that's missing is that some transitioning riders forget to change their mindsets when transitioning from one discipline to another. Thus, even before you consider things like trail-riding skills, techiques and so on, try to adjust your mindset and focus the essentials of trail riding as opposed to road riding.

Since you should already be a seasoned cyclist, the basics of riding will already be there - but trail riding sometimes demands that you forget a bit of what you learned and adopt a different mindset. Whereas road cycling, time-trial and velodrome disciplines tend to be more demanding in terms of the discipline and focus needed on the rider to maintain proper posture, power delivery, stroke and so on... trail riding requires a lot more out-of-saddle movement and different sensitivities.

On the road, you're looking at endurance, posture, aerodynamics and so on. On the trail your main concern is about traction, picking lines, braking points etc. As such, you'll might find find that the best way to begin is to change the things you focus on - your mindset - before you begin focusing on specific areas to develop.

Also, it is true that you're probably best off starting with easier trails and working on certain fundamentals before moving on to trails like BT and KR. I advise starting off on trails like Tampines because the gradients are quite reasonable and tampines, in particular, has a surface that forces the rider to place great emphasis on what's happening under the wheels. Not only does the trail have a wide spread of surfaces from loose gravel to thick mud, it also has sections such as board walks etc which are simple but help establish your basics. This will allow you to get a feel of things such as gear selection, body positioning, balance, braking points, traction and so on. Most of all, establishing all these basics will give you confidence and this is the number one things to getting off on the right foot.

At the end of the day, it's critical to your enjoyment of this sport (and indeed any sport) that you get these basics down and in a pleasant way - so try to go and learn with friends or get a mentor or group to help you along. This will ensure that your first few tries don't become your last few tries.

neOn
P.S. I know that the mud doesn't smell that good.... but it's not that bad either... LOL! After a few laps, you'll be too tired to care anyway so go for it. :D

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Posted on: 18th Mar 2009 10:55 PM    Quote and Reply


Wow, neOn, that is a lot to digest, but good stuff.

Will take all the advice with me; going to take it step by step.


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Posted on: 19th Mar 2009 1:14 AM    Quote and Reply


just get out there and enjoy ur ride. mountain biking, u can't avoid mud, bumps, slopes, just prepared to face it, enjoy what it throws at u and u will be back for more. better, fitter, faster and enjoying it more. remember on corners u can't see, just shout "BIKE" in case there are hikers around the bend.

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Posted on: 19th Mar 2009 10:24 AM    Quote and Reply


Just to add

 When comparing between tampines MTB trail and BT trail,

Tampines - Single track, you keep to one lane and ONLY one lane and eat everything that the trail throws at you

Bukit timah - Wide ass tracks, you face human obstacles as well as quite scary downhill paths and grueling uphill climbs

 

In BT you have to choose your lines more carefully because a wrong line choice can send you off the bike anytime.

Tampines, you have to learn to absorb the continuous bumps, its BUMPY, ALOT more bumpy then BT

BT - big hits, less hits.

TampTrail - Small hits, more hits

But either way, bukit timah isnt really a difficult trail so just enjoy yourself :D 

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Posted on: 19th Mar 2009 4:07 PM    Quote and Reply


BT = Fun, TT = Fun

PU = Fun

T15 = Fun

KR = Fun

BF = Fun

WC = Fun

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Posted on: 19th Mar 2009 4:08 PM    Quote and Reply


oops fingers too fast, bsically all trails in S'pore are fun go try them all!

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Posted on: 6th Apr 2009 5:00 PM    Quote and Reply


In addition to all that useful information, learning to brake properly will also come in handy. Front brake works best but can also send you over the bars if you're not careful. Get used to feathering both brakes on the descents and try not to skid as it causes erosion.

Get knobby tires that suit the terrain. It's doable but don't kill yourself using semi-slicks.

Learn to pick lines (up or down). You can even wheel your bike down a section before you ride it just to see how it travels.

Look where you want to go.

It's also useful if you know how to bail.

If you have to over think in order to get some courage to clear an obstacle or a section, it might be better to walk it. You can always come back to it another day.

Learning from watching and talking to others is a great way to pick stuff up. Good idea to chat with the friendly riders at the start point. Get a more experience rider to take you.

Somedays, you'll feel freaking clumsy and you'll stumble over even the simplest sections. This is normal.

Attend an MTB riding course or get a coach.

Ride BT a lot.


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Posted on: 7th Apr 2009 12:13 AM    Quote and Reply


BT101?  Go try the trail, fall down, try again.  Repeat till you get familiar with the trail. 

Don't ego try to speed too fast when you new.  That's it, should be no problem.


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Posted on: 24th Apr 2009 10:31 PM    Quote and Reply


if u thnk Tampines trail easy, try doing night trail without light

 

 

 

scarry 

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