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Topic: Convert mtb to city ride

Posted on: 13th Jun 2015 4:05 AM    Quote and Reply

So.. My friend just got himself a second hand GT Avalanche 2.0 for a good price. Besides some major overhauls and servicing to do, he's using it for short daily commutes and the occasional 50km. Being clueless with bicycles, I told him that he could probably convert his Avalanche into a commute decent enough to clock the miles comfortably and at speeds decent enough. He's now looking to me for advice and although I have ridden bicycles on and off through the years, mountain bikes are really the last thing people should ask me about, what more converting one into a hybrid. So i have a few questions:

1) I told him to change his tires. His bike came with double walled Alexs and a 2.6 knobbed tire. He's not doing trails so ai suggested a slimmer tire. What would be comfortable enough for him to roll over debris and small curbs on pavements yet still cruise smoothly? 2.0? 1.75? 2.2? Also, if he decides to go that thin, does he need to change the his current rims, seeing that his holds 2.6 now and might not hold skinnier tires.

2) His set also comes witha shimano groupset - deore rear and... Altus front. If he decides to go for a bigger outer chainring, would it be compatible with his derailleurs? How do we check if it is?

3) Are there any places to get these stuff on a tight budget? I know a shop in waterloo where I used to hang out to look for treasure when I was cycling a few years ago and I've found a few steals there but anyone know any other places?

4) Anything else I missed?

Thank you. 
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Posted on: 14th Jun 2015 3:38 AM    Quote and Reply


1) 1.75 or 1.5 can . 1.75 if he wants to drop curbs and fat debris (i would not recommend as it will be habitual & u will regret if u change to a roadie) but if hes doesn't wanna totally go off-road, and pure on roads (like roadie) then i advise 1.5 maxxis detonator.
No u dun have to change the rims, current one good enuff. but make sure u get 26inch wheels as 700CC wheels are for roadies. You may have to change the tubes to 1.5, as in previous posts, i got rebutted for advising on using slightly bigger tubes for small wheels. I personally am using 2.1 tubes for my 1.75 wheels , no punctures for half a year, but i let u decide.

2) from what i heard the biggest outter chain ring for MTB is 48 theeth chain ring. never heard of any MTBs going bigger than this.

3) Neighbourhood shops, if u build up repo with em. some minor stuff they may not have and may have to get from atas shops..etc QR converters, braze on FD adaptors....etc . Sorry the bike shop at waterloo is long gone, replaced by an ATAS bike shop moved in recently.

4) Change the tires first, the crankset can wait till the last. Also u can look out for a reasonably price rigid fork to replace the suspension front fork which is heavy. 

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Posted on: 14th Jun 2015 8:41 AM    Quote and Reply


Add a basket in front. This is the most useful thing because it makes it look unattractive when parked at mrt stations. 

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Posted on: 14th Jun 2015 12:53 PM    Quote and Reply


ya smart also can add a rack behind

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Posted on: 15th Jun 2015 11:25 AM    Quote and Reply


Quote:
"Formerly posted by newbonroad: So.. My friend just got himself a second hand GT Avalanche 2.0 for a good price. Besides some major overhauls and servicing to do, he's using it for short daily commutes and the occasional 50km. Being clueless with bicycles, I told him that he could probably convert his Avalanche into a commute decent enough to clock the miles comfortably and at speeds decent enough. He's now looking to me for advice and although I have ridden bicycles on and off through the years, mountain bikes are really the last thing people should ask me about, what more converting one into a hybrid. So i have a few questions:

1) I told him to change his tires. His bike came with double walled Alexs and a 2.6 knobbed tire. He's not doing trails so ai suggested a slimmer tire. What would be comfortable enough for him to roll over debris and small curbs on pavements yet still cruise smoothly? 2.0? 1.75? 2.2? Also, if he decides to go that thin, does he need to change the his current rims, seeing that his holds 2.6 now and might not hold skinnier tires.

2) His set also comes witha shimano groupset - deore rear and... Altus front. If he decides to go for a bigger outer chainring, would it be compatible with his derailleurs? How do we check if it is?

3) Are there any places to get these stuff on a tight budget? I know a shop in waterloo where I used to hang out to look for treasure when I was cycling a few years ago and I've found a few steals there but anyone know any other places?

4) Anything else I missed?

Thank you. "


My suggestion for this bike improvement project on a budget is to change tyres and also make sure all the mechanical bits are working 100% (brakes, shifters, cables, derailleurs, etc). No point thinking about upgrading the drivetrain, as replacing 1 part quite often has a knock-on effect (needing to replace derailleur and/or chain, etc).
So stick to what is currently installed. Repair or replace the faulty parts. Change the cables if they're rusty or not so smooth.

1 last question: Is the bike of the correct fit for your friend? If not, long distance riding could become a source of pain and discomfort.

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Posted on: 21st Jun 2015 12:32 AM    Quote and Reply


Hey guys, thanks for the prompt reply. He got himself another converted mtb - complete with 1.5 wide tires. I thought it was fine and he thought it was good too but he couldn't keep up on our rides(I ride a road) and was contemplating a gear upgrade. After some discussion, he is thinking of selling it off again to get a Raleigh Misceo 2.0.

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Posted on: 21st Jun 2015 2:14 AM    Quote and Reply


Its about the fitness, but what am i to say .. since u are riding a road, i rather that he go buy a roadie too. even a hybrid will have problem keeping up as the tires are thicker...700C X 28 to 32 (stock) and also the fork may not be carbon and hence makes it heavier. and also disc brakes make it even heavier. and u are also back to square one with 24 speed. a cheap  roadie min also 27 speed
IMO...i feel that he should just buy a roadie or cheap cyclocross like u

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