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Topic: Any foldie for triathlon??

Posted on: 17th Oct 2014 3:47 PM    Quote and Reply

Any that I can buy locally?
Any choices i have?
Freshie Forumer
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Posted on: 17th Oct 2014 3:48 PM    Quote and Reply


Saw online there is Dahon Speed Pro and Pacific Cycle Reach. Any more choice that I can buy from local shops?

Freshie Forumer
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Posted on: 17th Oct 2014 9:48 PM    Quote and Reply


If you are going to buy a bike for triathlon, why not just buy a proper road bike? A foldie will never be as efficient as a road bike, and a decent road bike can be had for $1.5K. 

Regular Forumer
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Posted on: 29th Dec 2014 1:30 AM    Quote and Reply


well, some of us does not have the space to store a full size tri-bike or roadie at our small size HDB flat/ room... so a foldie might be our only option... 

as for myself, i will be signing up my first triathelon in this year Tri Factor with a foldie... likely a Birdy Sport.... not sure if it's the best choice... but it's my current choice...

Freshie Forumer
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Posted on: 29th Dec 2014 7:48 AM    Quote and Reply


Another "mangkok" claiming foldie not efficient as roadie...  (roll eyes)

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Posted on: 29th Dec 2014 8:14 AM    Quote and Reply


It's mostly about rider power vs air resistance on a flat course
Bigger wheels with a little more weight are more efficient than smaller lighter wheels for triathlon or TT on the flat, they have a higher mass moment of inertia so they require more initial energy to accelerate but less effort to maintain speed. Uber light climbing wheels are also not ideal for TT or tri for the same reason. Smaller / lighter wheels require less effort  to accelerate /  or move against gravity. That is basic physics, pro TT bikes are all 1kg+ heavier than their road bikes - if it is a hilly course then any additional weight is a big disadvantage
If you are looking to start averaging speeds above 40kmph and be competitive you are better off with a dedicated aero TT bike. If you just want to particpate then a decent mini velo which gives a reasonably aero riding position is fine. I think that the bike not being specifically designed to minimize air resistance would be more of an issue than wheel size - same would go for a standard road bike

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Posted on: 29th Dec 2014 10:27 AM    Quote and Reply


Quote:
"Formerly posted by Zappadeedoohdah: It's mostly about rider power vs air resistance on a flat course
Bigger wheels with a little more weight are more efficient than smaller lighter wheels for triathlon or TT on the flat, they have a higher mass moment of inertia so they require more initial energy to accelerate but less effort to maintain speed. Uber light climbing wheels are also not ideal for TT or tri for the same reason. Smaller / lighter wheels require less effort  to accelerate /  or move against gravity. That is basic physics, pro TT bikes are all 1kg+ heavier than their road bikes - if it is a hilly course then any additional weight is a big disadvantage
If you are looking to start averaging speeds above 40kmph and be competitive you are better off with a dedicated aero TT bike. If you just want to particpate then a decent mini velo which gives a reasonably aero riding position is fine. I think that the bike not being specifically designed to minimize air resistance would be more of an issue than wheel size - same would go for a standard road bike"

I like ur theory, man.. 

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