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Topic: Recumbent Bike?

Posted on: 27th Jun 2010 8:40 PM    Quote and Reply


rbc,

This is his bike profile in togoparts: http://www.togoparts.com/bikeprofile/viewprofile.php?p=999&s=0

He had put his bike price cost inside. I think he is now still at UK


I got a very boring hobby... and that is reading history books
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Posted on: 28th Jun 2010 1:44 PM    Quote and Reply


I rode a two wheel recumbent years ago while working at a bike shop.
Things I remember:
its really fast!
hard to get moving initially (probably gets easier with practice)
way to low to the ground to be safe riding on the road...no one will see you
awkward stopping and getting your feet down...again, probably gets easier

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Posted on: 28th Jun 2010 6:33 PM    Quote and Reply


http://www.bentrideronline.com/messageboard/index.php

This is the forum for rebumbent riders.

A few observations about riding "bent" bikes

1. Muscle group utilized is different, you have to discover which parts are used and you may find muscle aches in places where you didn't even realise you had places.

2. Its MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH did I say MUCH more comfortable to ride recumbents. No saddle sores, no wrist pains, no strain here, numb there after long rides.

3. Uphill is usually more difficult as you cannot stand up to add more leverage, but if you're on a trike, you can go as slow as you want cause you won't fall, but if you're on a bent bike, then you better practicie anticipating and shift sooner and get ready to spin.

4. Downhills.... whoa here's where the fun is, it just zips down so smooooothy!!

5. Nobody can pick up a draft from you, cause you have 1/3 their profile of wind resistance.

6. Flags - Important in traffic, but when I ride my trike on the road, I realize that drivers actually give me much more clearance!! That was a pleasent suprise, I guess because its something unusual and they DO pay more attention.

7. Some of you may have seen me at this year's runway ride with my red trident stowaway.

The model I have can be seen at

http://www.tridenttrikes.com


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Posted on: 29th Jun 2010 7:50 PM    Quote and Reply


SIM37 and motomuppet,

Many thanks for sharing your experiences. I believe other readers may also find the information enlightening

I lack storage space for a trike so can only consider recumbent bike (I do some research on internet for what are available)

Wishing you all happy cycling

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Posted on: 29th Jun 2010 10:12 PM    Quote and Reply


I have a blue BikeE bought way back in 1992. Try to google BikeE , I think the company no longer around, but it is one of the easiest recumbent bikes to ride. Uphill is slow bot downhill is a blast, reach top speed of 80km/h before.

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Posted on: 28th Aug 2010 12:09 AM    Quote and Reply


I ride a Catrike 700, mostly at the ECP and other park connectors.  There are at least two other trike riders there, amongst at least two hand cyclists.  There's a local chap on a Performer and a whiskered ang moh on a Greenspeed.  I think the same ang moh just got himself an ICE Vortex 2 from Hong Kong's Velocity Racer.  I saw the trike at the shop when I bought my Optima Baron just today, a low racer with very sensitive steering.  Something I'll have to learn to ride with many crashes to guide me.

As for trike-riding, I agree with SIM37 on all counts.  It's ACTUALLY safer riding that thing on the roads.  I get one full lane to myself when cars pass.  I even rode once in Chinatown on it!  A little foolish and not recommended.

There are folding trikes you can consider.  The Vortex 2 folds.  So do some Greenspeed models.  HP Velotechnik, amongst other brands, has folding trikes, too.  Be aware that folding models may come at a weight premium.

2-wheeled recumbents, unless they fold, are as long as trikes, but not as wide.  My Baron is about 1.7m from tip (not including the boom) to drop-out.  Include the boom and rear wheel and the thing is longer than 2m.  Transport to the park is a problem.

Optima has a folding model in the works but has not entered production yet, I think.  It's called Voyager, if I remember correctly.

Hope that helps. 

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Posted on: 28th Aug 2010 6:57 AM    Quote and Reply


Quote:
"Formerly posted by mauler: I ride a Catrike 700, mostly at the ECP and other park connectors.  There are at least two other trike riders there, amongst at least two hand cyclists.  There's a local chap on a Performer and a whiskered ang moh on a Greenspeed.  I think the same ang moh just got himself an ICE Vortex 2 from Hong Kong's Velocity Racer.  I saw the trike at the shop when I bought my Optima Baron just today, a low racer with very sensitive steering.  Something I'll have to learn to ride with many crashes to guide me.

As for trike-riding, I agree with SIM37 on all counts.  It's ACTUALLY safer riding that thing on the roads.  I get one full lane to myself when cars pass.  I even rode once in Chinatown on it!  A little foolish and not recommended.

There are folding trikes you can consider.  The Vortex 2 folds.  So do some Greenspeed models.  HP Velotechnik, amongst other brands, has folding trikes, too.  Be aware that folding models may come at a weight premium.

2-wheeled recumbents, unless they fold, are as long as trikes, but not as wide.  My Baron is about 1.7m from tip (not including the boom) to drop-out.  Include the boom and rear wheel and the thing is longer than 2m.  Transport to the park is a problem.

Optima has a folding model in the works but has not entered production yet, I think.  It's called Voyager, if I remember correctly.

Hope that helps. "

Many thanks. Thats very helpful. I thought I had to gave up on trikes. It may be heavier, but I believe safety wise much better

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Posted on: 28th Aug 2010 8:07 AM    Quote and Reply


Quote:
"Formerly posted by rbc1891:Many thanks. Thats very helpful. I thought I had to gave up on trikes. It may be heavier, but I believe safety wise much better"


Happy to help!

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Posted on: 12th Dec 2010 7:04 PM    Quote and Reply


Just bought a second hand two wheeled top steering one. No brand at all. Its stable and fast. Really fast! Stability comes from having the right Crank length. Once you got that right the bike is a dream. 

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Posted on: 13th Dec 2010 6:30 AM    Quote and Reply


Do I size crank length just like for road bike?

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